Mathematics: Geometry and Spatial Sense
- describe the relative locations and the movements of objects on a map
Vocabulary for coding (algorithm, symbol, debugging)
These lessons provide opportunities for teachers and students to gather evidence through teacher, peer, and self-assessments; and learning goals and success criteria. See Growing Success: Assessment, Evaluation, and Reporting in Ontario Schools, Chapter 4 for more information.
  • Grid sheet
  • Floor grid (using masking tape for the inside and chalk for the outside; or use a Learning Carpet)
  • An object to move around the grid - e.g., stuffed animal, game piece
  • Sticky notes to write their code
  • Anchor charts for vocabulary and symbols
This is the minds on button.

Review vocabulary (coding, algorithm, symbol, debugging) with students.

Review location and movement on grid maps (e.g., what does “moving 3 squares to the right and 2 squares down” look like on a grid?)

This is the action button.
  • Create a grid on the floor with masking tape (or use a Learning Carpet with a grid).
  • Discuss and create the language or symbols with your students (e.g., FW or → = forward 1 square, BW or ← = backward 1 square, LT90 or ↺ = left turn 90 degrees, RT90 or ↻ = right turn 90 degrees).
  • This is an image of a student writing code on paper .
  • Explain to students that you will be writing a simple algorithm (a list of steps that you can follow to finish a task) using the established language to move an object on the grid to a predetermined spot.
  • After students have written their algorithm, they can test the program to see if it ran the way they intended it to. If their program did not run correctly (the object did not reach the intended square), the student can go back and debug it (remove or fix the mistakes from the program) and run it again.

After students have written their algorithm, they can test the program to see if it ran the way they intended it to.

If their program did not run correctly (the object did not reach the intended square), the student can go back and debug it (remove or fix the mistakes from the program) and run it again.

This is the consolidation button.
Students have the opportunity to perform their peer’s program.
Students will submit their Grid sheet.
Teacher can use “left turn one direction” to clarify the 90 degree turn.