Teacher Notes

How to Use this Resource

Students may play eMe in class or at home. They can play all or part of the game. The educator may choose the lesson or part of lesson s/he wishes to use with the class. The lessons progress in the order they are played; however, all lessons do not have to be used in sequence. In addition, student participation is not dependent on individual play; the class can play the game by projecting the app on a SMART Board or screen.

Students are encouraged to replay parts of the game if they are unsatisfied with their results. A student may want to see what happens if s/he intentionally makes unsafe or poor decisions.

Unless noted, each lesson requires a 45-60 minute block.

If students are asked to play the game independently (on a personal device), educators should inform parents/guardians that playing the game (or a section) is an extension of their student’s learning. Communication with parents to support and encourage learning at home related to financial literacy is always beneficial.

Lesson 1

My Email Persona

Note about the Game

In this section, students enter the game for the first time. Players are prompted to choose appropriate email addresses that do not reveal age, gender, location, or anything else that identifies the user.

At the end of the section, players read, “Be sure to choose an email address that won’t be embarrassing if you gave it to a future employer. Remember that a secure password prevents your email account from being hacked. This keeps your personal, including financial, information safe.”


Learning Goals

Co-construct learning goals with students that focus on using drama to examine the impact of an idea (the use of safe and less safe email).

Time Description Notes

10 min.

The teacher will provide a list of email accounts. Students will place them along a continuum from not great/not safe to looks good/safe. Students can work in small groups, using a t-chart, to sort their choices.

MJ341576@mail.com
PartyDude@mail.com
Partygirl_13@mail.com
6740932_Callme@mail.com
pumpkinpie@mail.com
mabrr@mail.com
Pizza_boy_13@mail.com
snowbrdr@mail.com
Jelly_bean@mail.com
fieldgoal@mail.com

Ask students to provide reasons for their choices and identify what features make an email name safer or better.

Online: similar to drag and drop

On paper: cut out email addresses and place on a line

Appendix

Time Description Notes

30 min.

Students choose one email address from the not great/unsafe end of the scale, write, and act out a scenario from the future.

Example
There is a job at the local coffee shop. To apply, you must send your resume via email. Your email address is Partygirl_13@mail.com or Partyboy_13@mail.com. Act out the job interview. Then, students can act out the same scenario using a safer email address, such as mabrr@mail.com. Compare and contrast the tone that is set by each address.

In order to focus on the positive and help students identify what features make an address safe and appropriate, ask students to choose an address from the other end of the scale and act out a different scenario. Reinforce the learning by having students identify what features make the address a better choice.

Alternatively, students can create a Bitstrips cartoon showing the interaction between the employer and interviewee in both situations.

Time Description Notes

15 min.

In a class discussion, list information one should avoid when creating an email address e.g., gender, location, DOB, phone number.

Students will write a reflection about choices in email addresses.

Online: blog post

On paper: journal

Include a discussion about assigned email addresses, such as ones given by schools or companies:

a.student@schoolboard.on.ca, employee@company.ca

Is it wise to use these for daily communication outside of school/work? Why or why not? What strategies can you use to keep track of information and different accounts if you have multiple accounts?

When would it be advantageous to use a work/school email account instead of a personal account?

When would it be advantageous to use a personal account instead of work/school account?

If you were purchasing items using an online shopping site, which handle would be preferable? Why?

Lesson 2

Scamblock

Note about the Game

This section focuses on scam emails that can lead to viruses in computers/devices. It prompts the player to choose whether to click on links and attachments from various scams.

At the end of this section, players read, “In this activity, you explored ways to recognize and deal with scams and how to protect access to your bank account and personal information. It may be hard to recognize a legitimate email. If you are unsure, check with a trusted adult.”


Learning Goals

Co-construct learning goals with students that focus on helping students understand the risks and implications of viruses (and information) and how they are transmitted.

Time Description Notes

10 min.

The teacher begins with a quick discussion about how it feels to get the flu. Students will likely discuss getting the flu shot as a way to halt the virus. They will note that the flu shot doesn’t treat all strains of the virus.

Time Description Notes

30 min.

Students will play a game about getting a virus. Note re sensitivity/awareness: Reinforce that this is a simulated activity and reinforce classroom ground rules about treating each other with respect (i.e., specifically watch for teasing or stigma directed at anyone who is identified as having the virus).

  1. The teacher randomly selects two student names from a hat/jar/box that have the virus. Ensure that students know this is a random choice. Neither those students nor the others will know who they are.
  2. Students will rotate around the room (to music), shaking hands of two people. Students record the names of the two people.
  3. They again rotate around the room, shaking hands with two different people. Again, they will record these two names.
  4. They rotate around the room a third time, shaking hands with two more people. Again, they will record the names.
  5. At this point, every student should have a list of six students.
  6. The teacher reads out the name of the first student with the virus. Anyone with that student’s name puts a star next to that name (or highlights). Those who have the viral student’s name in their first meeting raise their hands and others who have their names cross check it with their list. And so on…

Source

Curriculum Centre Viruses

Teachers must ensure that the student with the virus is not teased or stigmatized.

Time Description Notes

15 min.

Critical Thinking

Linking the game to computer viruses: What walls do we put up on computers/cellphones that help us keep viruses at bay? Are there things we do to make us more susceptible to viruses? (e.g., “jailbreaking” – when the appearance on your cellphone is altered).

Students can respond in small group discussions, blog post, journal, etc.

Consider how this applies in other situations (e.g., sexually transmitted infections, the spread of rumours or gossip).

Consider how ecosystems work and how things are connected.

Consider how to reduce risk, transmission of disease and/or information.

Is there a way to stop viruses altogether? Students can research the varying success of virus-stopping software.

Are there certain computers/devices that are more prone to “catching” viruses? Is this a consideration when purchasing a new computer/device?

Lesson 3

Phonewise

Note about the Game

This section outlines steps to take when your smartphone is lost or stolen (e.g., contact the phone provider, put a lock on your phone, or research the various apps that find lost phones).

At the end of this section, players read, “In this activity, you were given the opportunity to learn how to keep your phone and personal information safe.

These safeguards prevent others from running up charges on your phone, getting personal data from your phone such as banking information, or impersonating you on email or social media. If you feel you could learn more from this activity by changing the decisions you made, go ahead and Replay.”

Vocabulary

data, tech support, texting, app, gigabyte, megabyte

Learning Goals

Co-construct learning goals with students that focus on collecting and using data to support making effective decisions about purchases.

Time Description Notes

10 min.

Sort Activity

What do you consider when you purchase a cell phone? Sort according to priority. Cut out choices for students to prioritize. They must choose their top three priorities from this list:

  • Speed
  • Cost
  • Brand
  • Tech support
  • Texting
  • Data
  • App access

The teacher will lead students in a discussion to determine the class priorities. Students may rate the items or compare data from polls.

Time Description Notes

May take a few classes (2-3 x 40 min.)

Investigate phone charges and data plans. What is it that you want in a phone? List your considerations.

Have students (in groups or pairs) pick three similar packages (using the same phone) using local providers. Graph their findings.

Each group/pair will present their findings and decide which package they would choose should they be purchasing a cell phone.

Students can graph using a computer (Excel) or by hand.

Time Description Notes

30+

Students are given a budget of $100. They will justify their choice of cellphone and plan based on the graphing exercise.

Online: blog post In class: journal

Look into apps like Find My iPhone and discuss privacy issues that may arise when using one of these apps from a company other than the maker of the phone.

Lesson 4

Banking Online

Note about the Game

This section focuses on online banking in a secure environment (e.g., avoid public Wi-Fi, if possible) and close browsers at the end of any transactions.

At the end of this section, players read, “Banking online is convenient but there is risk involved. As you learned from this activity, online banking from a public computer can put your digital security at risk. Online banking should be done on a private computer. Log off as soon as you complete your transactions. This is a key way to keep your financial information private.”

Vocabulary

liability, fraud, identity theft

Learning Goals

Co-construct learning goals with students that focus on the critical analysis of information to determine the safest approach to banking.

Time Description Notes

10 min.

Ask students to role-play as younger students to reflect on a concept, and play a game of Doggie doggie, who has your bone with the whole class or a few students.

Discuss with students and ask them to reflect on how it feels when you’ve had something stolen.

Words like violated, angry or revenge may come up.

Time Description Notes

25 min.

Lead the class in a discussion about what is more secure:

  • banking online in a public place vs. private home
  • using Wi-Fi vs. a corded desktop computer
  • banking in person vs. online banking

Time Description Notes

10 min.

Students will share their t-charts with the whole class and make a recommendation to their peers based on their pro/con lists. Reflect on the discussion from Minds On and ask students to think about how that relates to considerations for security.

The teacher can lead the class in a discussion about access to some of these choices (e.g., in a small town, there may not be an option to bank in person due to bank hours or bank location.)

Take students to a local bank branch to learn more about banking options. Ask how banks ensure security.

Lesson 5

Spacebooked

Note about the Game

This section focuses on setting up a personal social media profile in the fictional Spacebook site. As in My Email Persona, players are urged to avoid sharing personal information, which could lead to safety concerns.

At the end of this section, players read, “In this activity, you thought about the information you want to share online. You considered privacy settings and ways to keep your digital information and identity secure. Online information must be secure and shared in ways that will not jeopardize your privacy or make you vulnerable to frauds and scams.

You can choose the level of privacy setting that protects your information and allows you to maintain a positive digital image for friends, family, and potential employers.”

Vocabulary

private, public, profile

Learning Goals

Co-construct learning goals with students that focus on awareness of social pressures and consider privacy and protection when setting up online profiles.

Time Description Notes

10 min.

Sorting activity between what’s private and what is public:

  • Your jacket
  • Your diary
  • School
  • Library
  • Coffee Shop
  • Kitchen stove

How are some things both public and private? (e.g., A conversation in a coffee shop might be private, but the location is not).

Perhaps the items could be colour-coded—blue for private, yellow for public. Some items would turn green for both.

Time Description Notes

30 min.

Students will have an opportunity to create an online profile for a fictional student using the Spacebook app/site. They will negotiate in pairs or trios the choices about what to share and then justify their choices. Students should feel free to creatively add to the profiles provided in order to enhance their enjoyment of the activity.

Give two profiles and create a page for each student:

Name: Anita Dillon
Gender: F
DOB: May 1, (The year will match student’s birth year.)
School: John A. MacDonald Middle School
Interests: soccer, music, karate
Family: A younger brother

Name: Kieran James
Gender: M
DOB: October 5, (The year will match student’s birth year.)
School: Terry Fox School
Interests: reading, basketball, cooking
Family: An older sister in high school

Time Description Notes

15 min.

Critical Thinking

How do you balance the need for lots of friends and keeping up with friends with the need for privacy?

Lead students in a discussion about consent. Ask how sharing a confidence with a friend can lead to others knowing about a private feeling/thought.

Example

A friend messages another friend that s/he is nervous about presenting a speech. The receiving friend posts a note of encouragement on his/her page and tags the confiding friend.

Discuss how sharing information and getting permission can be an act of consent from the source. Students must know that privacy may sometimes be broken in order to protect another’s safety (in the case of abuse, neglect, assault, etc.).

Lesson 6

Read My Mind

Note about the Game

This section will focus on pop-ups that appear after a user has searched for information or clicked on various websites or pop-ups, usually aiming to sell a product or pique interest. It seems to the viewer that their computer/device knows them, as the pop-ups are often related to other products the viewer has searched.

At the end of this section, players read, “We’ve explored ways that your activity in social media sends information to advertisers to help them market their products more effectively.

By clicking like or sharing a post with friends tells advertisers more about you. This might be OK; however, you may decide that you don’t want to share your information with advertisers, so you choose not to click like.

As always, it’s important to think before you click.”

Vocabulary

clickbait, demographic, trends, market research

Learning Goals

Co-construct learning goals with students that focus on media and how it is used to share information about marketing strategies and their impact.

Time Description Notes

10 min.

Whole-Class Discussion

Imagine you’re walking through a mall carrying a bag from a toy store. What might that say about you to other customers? Store owners? Clerks?

If you were carrying a bag from a high-end clothing store, would you be treated differently?*

The teacher will lead students to a discussion of consumer profiling, wherein advertising firms and market researchers try to distill ones’ purchasing trends into trends for an entire demographic and vice versa.

*Teens/tweens often face discriminatory practices when entering stores, so there may be issues of age, race, and gender, which could enter into this conversation.

Time Description Notes

10 min.

The following sample infographic was created by a marketing company:

Infographic: Why Millennials Love Video Marketing

Make copies available or share digital copies of the infographic for students to analyze, using the media triangle (Appendix). Students will answer questions about audience, purpose, form, and the elements of design (line, shape and form, space, colour, texture and value) for the infographic.

Students work in small groups to develop and gather information about demographics and the use of information in marketing and then develop an outline for their own infographic, poster or alternate means of sharing this information.

Time Description Notes

10 min.

Share infographics and describe key learning.

Critical Thinking

In what ways do advertisers use pop-ups, banners, and targeted messages to distract users from their tasks and to purchase items/think in a certain way? Use personal examples to support your answer.

How can awareness of this strategy influence your purchasing behavior?

Is there a way to block pop-ups on your computer or device? How often should you clear your cache?

Lesson 7

Keep Your PIN Safe

Note about the Game

This section focuses on keeping your PIN safe. Do not share your PIN. Do not write down your PIN or store it electronically—Protecting Your Credit Card PIN.

Royal Bank information site on protecting your PIN.

At the end of this section, players read, “This activity was about digital safety and the safe-keeping of banking information. You will develop financial literacy skills around protection of sensitive, financial information.”

Vocabulary

debit, branch, master key

Learning Goals

Co-construct learning goals with students that focus on self-awareness, strategies to stay safe online, and analysis and sharing of information about staying safe online.

Time Description Notes

10 min.

Whole Class Discussion

Share what can happen if you share your locker combination with a friend who later falls out of favour. This can be an awkward situation.

There may be discussion about the “master key” that unlocks all locks from the same manufacturer.

Time Description Notes

2 classes

In pairs, have students visit RCMP Internet Fraud and Scams -- Fact Sheet

Students will identify three major threats and discuss how to protect themselves.

Students will use the information from the media triangle and the outline developed in the previous lesson to create a one-page infographic or poster explaining the dangers of Internet fraud and scams. They will include strategies to prevent issues and protect themselves and others. This could be a page used in a school agenda or be posted in the school halls, classrooms, or library.

Create posters by hand or on the computer.

Time Description Notes

Students will display their infographics or posters for peers and point out similarities and differences in the posters. Who highlighted which frauds and scams? What key strategies are either common or unique?

If students have omitted parts of the RCMP site that could affect their lives, the teacher will take time to review that section.

If students have omitted parts of the RCMP site that could affect their lives, the teacher will take time to review that section.

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